Family Law Hub

Cohabitation

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  • On the evidence presented before the court, and judged by the doctrines of common intention constructive trust and proprietary estoppel, the court found that the claimant had not proved her case that there had been an agreement between her and her cohabitee that she would share any profit after the farm, which was legally owned by the defendent, was sold. Judgment, 11/05/2018, free
  • Findings revealed in survey released alongside launch of highlight Cohabitation Awareness Week News, 27/11/2017, free
  • Lord Neuberger's At A Glance Conference Keynote Speech News, 18/07/2017, free
  • Appeal against a decision by the Court of Appeal in the Bahamas that it had been the intention of the parties, who had been in a personal relationship for nearly 17 years, that they should hold various investment properties in equal beneficial shares. The appeal was allowed - the Court of Appeal’s finding that there was sufficient evidence to permit a conclusion that it was the common intention of the parties that the beneficial interest should be shared was unsustainable. The case was remitted for hearing before the Supreme Court of the Bahamas. Judgment, 26/05/2017, free
  • Figures revealed in a survey of more than 1,000 cohabiting couples News, 06/04/2017, free

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