Family Law Hub

Enforcement

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  • The children had repeatedly told their guardian, and through her the court, that they wanted to continue living with their mother in England. The Spanish court had ordered that they live with their father in Spain. Russell J DBE found that on any objective and neutral analysis both children were habitually resident in England. They were settled here and were fully integrated into their schools and social environment. There was no significant evidence contrary to such a finding, and jurisdiction was with and in this court. The mother's appeal against enforcement of the Spanish order was allowed. The children would live with her, and would have contact with the father, subject to him providing written permission for the renewal of the children's passports, and documentary evidence that the Spanish order had been discharged and all criminal complaints in Spain against the mother had been dropped. Judgment, 06/02/2020, free
  • The former wife sought a Hadkinson order barring the husband from proceeding with an appeal in Family Law Act proceedings unless he made good the default in his payments of child maintenance. Cohen J noted that this might be the first time the Hadkinson principle was extended to cover proceedings which were related but not identical. However, the remedy could be extended to this situation, and the husband's appeal in the related matter would be struck out unless he paid the maintenance due. Judgment, 27/01/2020, free
  • The wife's judgment summons alleged the accrual of significant arrears. The husband claimed that he was subject to cashflow difficulties. Mostyn J was satisfied that there had been a sufficient change of circumstances and a sufficiency of evidential proof to justify a suspension, rather than a variation. The judgment summons would be adjourned while a private FDR took place. Judgment, 18/12/2019, free
  • The wife was seeking to enforce a financial order made in her favour. It had been the largest financial order ever made in favour of a wife in the jurisdiction and the husband had not paid a penny of it. She now made this application in respect of documents which had been obtained from a former employee of the husband, who was now assisting in her litigation enforcement efforts. An application for directions pursuant to UL v BK should have been made when the documents were received, but was not. Given that this was a case involving fraud and evasion on the husband's part, Knowles J directed that the wife and her lawyers were entitled to retain and use certain of the documents as if they had been disclosed by the husband, including those that were potentially privileged. Knowles J also gave guidance as to what should be done in similar situations in future. Judgment, 27/11/2019, free
  • The trustees had failed to give disclosure as ordered in Akhmedova v Akhmedov & Ors [2019] EWHC 2561 (Fam). The freezing and disclosure orders made then had subsequently been upheld by the Liechtenstein Constitutional Court, and a criminal investigation was taking place in that country with regard to fraudulent bankruptcy, money laundering and thwarting enforcement. Knowles J held that the reasons for granting the freezing orders had been reinforced by subsequent events, and so they would remain in effect. Judgment, 22/10/2019, free

Latest know-how

Latest training

  • Tim Scott QC of 29 Bedford Row tries to make sense of what might happen to international family cases after 29th March next year and reviews a few recent key international finance cases. Recorded September 2018. Webcast, 07/10/2018, members only
  • Alexis Campbell QC and Charlotte Trace, of 29 Bedford Row, review the key financial remedy cases and themes from the past 12 months and look at how they will affect judicial thinking and your own cases in the year to come. Webcast, 16/03/2018, members only
  • Webinar broadcast on 21 January 2014 presented by Amber Sheridan and Petra Teacher of 29 Bedford Row Webcast, 21/01/2014, registration required
  • Get up to date with all the latest changes to the family justice and procedure presented by David Salter of Mills & Reeve. Webcast, 01/06/2012, registration required

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